In brief...

I'm a Nature-lover, aspiring conservationist, and wannabe traveller in search of outdoor adventure.
My interests vary from conservation to education to heritage to Nature (biodiversity & wildlife) to outdoor activities to life in general.
They occupy most of my waking moment.
Do read my blogs, follow me on Twitter (@jocelynesze) and friend me on Facebook (subject to my discretion). Visit my Nature blog, Nature Rambles, at http://natureramble.wordpress.com.

UPDATE 2 Apr 2017 - This site is no longer maintained, please visit jocelynesze.wordpress.com if you're interested in more recent writing.

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Convincing others of your worth.

That's the whole point of exams really, isn't it. To convince your examiners that the three years' of education (of money, time and resources put into YOU) wasn't wasted.

So on top of the 4 papers that covers the 4 modules we did over the past 2 terms, us Part II zoologists also have to do a general essay paper. "The Essay paper is an opportunity for you to write an extended piece on a topic of broad zoological interest." 11 questions covering science methods, evolution, environment/policy, science/policy, and a bunch others. We only need to write one question, and we've got 2 hours and it's worth 5% of our total grade.

I kinda wish I could just submit my Nature blog and be like, look, I've been thinking very seriously about this for years, I might not be able to write a first-class essay for exams but trust me, I have been thinking super super hard about it.

And then, I attempt to revise for my vertebrate and mammalian evolution modules and be like fml argh I'm never gonna get all this in my head in time. It doesn't help that the names are all so similar. Sphenodon (the tuatara, like a weird lizard) and Sphenacodon (extinct 'pelycosaur', ancestor of mammals) and the endless -saur and -thyris :/

The Sphenodon. Image taken from: http://www.waza.org/en/zoo/select-a-region/oceania/reptiles/lizards-and-tuatara/sphenodon-punctatus
The Sphenacodon. Image taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphenacodon

It's sometimes perhaps easier to convince others of your worth when you have lots of money and power.

I posted this on my Facebook a couple of days ago.

"The thing about being a billionaire (having power & money) is the huge influence you can have.
One guy puts in lots of money to save a national forest, get it protected, improved schools and clinics in the area and get lots of people employed (turn poachers to rangers).
http://mosaicscience.com/story/wilson-and-carroll
One guy wants to build a 173-mile canal across the country, supposedly boosting the economy but potentially displacing 10000s people inc indigenous, destroying 400,000ha of natural habitat, dredging the largest freshwater body in the region, threatening endemic biodiversity and introducing invasives.
http://e360.yale.edu/…/nicaragua_canal_a_giant_projec…/2871/
Money makes the world go round."

And I think that's what capitalism has done to us. I'm not an economist or any kind of analyst, so I feel like I'm not really qualified to pass judgements, nor do I really have any substance/evidence to back me up (too much effort right now). But so much wealth is concentrated in the hands of so few, and they have got so much power over the rest of us. I hope they realise that whatever actions they take, they have profound consequences and effects on hundreds of thousands or even millions of lives.

Image taken from: http://oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/do-poorer-countries-have-less-capacity-for-redistribution-a-new-paper/

But our worth is not judged based on our wealth. And do we really need to convince others of our worth? I guess that's what birthdays and mother/father's days are for.  To show these people that they're worth way more than a grade on an exam. 

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